Hideous BMW iNext unveiled with Harry Potter tech

September 17, 2018

When the future threatens us with ugly cars, it just makes us angry. Still, Harry Potter fans will love this!

 

 

Now, we're not stupid. We know very well that this BMW will never look like this when it arrives, but goodness gracious gents - if it does, the 20s is not going to be a fun decade for BMW lovers.

 

Of course though, concepts are not about pleasing you, are they? They are about vision, standing-out, making themselves memorable enough so that when you go to bed tonight you know that BMW will still be around in ten years time when you're rich enough to buy one.

 

Well burn out our eye balls and rob us blind. We don't want the money to buy cars as ugly as this. We'd rather taxi our lives away than be seen in this sneezing bunny-rabbit and chilling in its far-out cabin.

 

 

 

 

Indeed, this makes us angry. It plays into the narrative that electric cars have to be "alternative" looking because they are the alternative to petrol. But why? Why can't they just be as good-looking as good-looking petrol cars are?

 

Well, the answer is simple and one we've discussed before. BMW know very well that this concept is ugly but the only reason they've made it futuristic and stupid-looking is because of Tesla. 

 

Yes, in a world quickly turning electric, BMW want to make you well aware that they also produce electric cars and this is their way of showing it.

 

In fact, one of BMWs biggest marketing downfalls over the last five years has been their inability to show the world how electric they've become and how many electrified cars they actually produce, which, believe it or not, is actually Tesla-beating.

 

 

 

Now though, they're making up for their well-kept secret and want to scream it to the world. They want you to know very clearly (exceptionally clearly as you can see) that you are looking at an electric vehicle even if that means making it as ugly as sin.

 

It all means this: In ten years time, you will associate electricity with BMW and vice versa, and that there is their goal. To become a go-to brand in the electric car world as the electric 20s roll on in. Brace yourselves!

 

All that aside though, now this: The inside.

 

 

Of course, it will be autonomous (level 3 to be exact), but the real selling-point here are the interactive materials. Sure, screens might be every where but it's not the screens that are most relevant here.

 

Instead, it's that big wooden material arm rest in the middle that's most telling. It is an interactive piece that you can touch and pinch and squeeze and each movement does something to the car, like change the radio station, or zoom in on a map.

 

This interactive material, according to BMW, is the future and replaces knobs and buttons and all that tedious finger exercise. Pretty cool, we think.

 

But, the coolest thing about the inside is the most unnecessary (as it always is in cars like these). Utilising a technology called Intelligent Beam, it picks up the blank pages of an empty book (one that can be found behind Dad's seat we can only assume) and then projects images onto the blank page.

 

What it does then essentially is gives birth to a live and interactive magazine (or book or newspaper) in the palm of your hand that changes issues when you want it to, and contains videos and moving pictures and all that jazz - but on paper! Yes, it is meant to replace tablets and reignite paper as a new, digital alternative.

 

Why BMW have made this, goodness knows, but it is very Harry Potter like if you know what I mean, so cheers to you-know-who.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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